Page 17 - RV Alaska
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 SOUTHCENTRAL ALASKA
 Exploring the Kenai Peninsula
  The Kenai Peninsula, only 200 miles south of Anchorage, boasts colorful coastal towns, glacier and wildlife sightseeing as well as recreational activities including sailing, kayaking and fishing. The Kenai Peninsula abuts the eastern edge of the Cook Inlet, one of Alaska’s most economically productive regions. Due to its abundant commercial and recreational fisheries, along with sizable petroleum resources,
the peninsula has seen significant development over the past several decades. Fortunately, the nearly three million acre region made up of the Kenai National Wildlife refuge and the adjacent Kenai Fjords National Park has been set aside to protect the area’s natural beauty from development and provide endless opportunities for outdoor recreation.
The Kenai Peninsula is an excellent place for RV travel with a number of campsites along its western edge, most of which have access to fishing or are located right on the shore. Some RV parks have fish-cleaning stations, vacuum sealing equipment, freezers and overnight shipping services for your catches.
The peninsula also has no shortage of spectacular outdoor opportunities. Kenai Fjords National Park, on the south coast of the Kenai Peninsula, is a 1,047-square-mile national park where you
can see black bears and whales in their natural habitat. The Harding Icefield, located inside the park, is a 300-square-mile area of glaciers, fjords and islands, and home to a variety of marine mammals including sea lions, sea otters and seals. Bird inhabitants of the park include puffins, murres and auklets. At least 38 glaciers flow from the icefield, eight of which reach the sea and calve, sending chunks of ice into the ocean in a spectacular display of the power of nature. Kenai Fjords National Park can be reached by boat, road or float plane.
Kenai, home of the world famous Kenai River
The largest community on the peninsula is the town of Kenai. Located just 155 miles from Anchorage on the Sterling Highway, it is known as a hotspot for sport fishing with the Kenai River salmon fishery bringing in thousands of visitors every year. The wetlands around the town provide a home for a wide variety of fish and wildlife species, making this an ideal destination for nature lovers. Kenai also boasts a long and rich cultural history with the Dena’ina Athabascans tribe occupying a permanent village of more than 1,000 inhabitants long before Europeans arrived. Later on, Russians settled in the Kenai area around 1741, before selling Alaska to the USA in 1867.
Kenai is a great place to base yourself during your adventures on the peninsula. It’s centrally located and with a population of over 7,000, it’s a metropolis compared to many Alaskan communities. As such there’s plenty of grocery stores, restaurants, and accommodation options and at somewhat more affordable prices than would be found in smaller towns.
ALASKA’S PLAYGROUND
Soldotna
Just eleven miles to the southeast of Kenai, at the junction of the Sterling Highway and the spur road to Kenai National Park, is the town of Soldotna. Like many of the other communities along the peninsula, its known for it’s abundant fishing opportunities and engaging culture and history. While not very big, both the Soldotna Historical Society Museum and the town’s visitors center provide
a fascinating look at how the community has come into its own, from the time of Native American settlement, to the homesteaders arriving in the 1940s, all the way up to the present day. To see
the town at its best, visit during one of its summer festivals. Every Wednesday from June through August, there’s live music, food trucks, and an arts in crafts fair in Soldotna Creek Park. In early June of each year, the community comes together to celebrate the riches that the river has provided them with the Soldotna River Festival, which includes a BBQ, crafts market, live music and 5 or 10K races. The Soldotna Progress Days festival in late July includes dutch oven and chain saw carving competitions along with live music and crafts. Another great festival occurs just an hour south of Soldotna, in the town of Ninilchik; in late August the residents celebrate Salmonfest with three days of music and great food.
 Views at the mouth of the Kenai River
          L L o o d d g g e e & & R RV V P P a a r r k k
------ HISTORIC OLD TOWN KENAI ------ Magnificent views of the Cook Inlet & Kenai River Volcanoes • Beluga whales
Seals • Fishing • Beach
Lodge Rooms & Cabins with a view
Book Bear & Fishing Charters
              BELUGA LOOKOUT RV PARK
BLUFF VIEW
KENAI VISITOR CENTER
65 RV Hookups • Pull thrus 20-30-50 Amps • Firepits Picnic Tables • Pavilion Caravans Welcome Private Showers & Bathrooms Laundry • Free TV & WiFi Gift Shop
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           (907) 283-5999 | 929 Mission Ave, Kenai AK belugarv@belugalookout.com | www.belugalookout.com
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